The
Journey of
Meditation

awaken your awareness

The
Journey of
Meditation

awaken your awareness

THE MIND
STREAM

Have you ever stopped for a moment and paid attention to your inner experience? Our inner experience consists of thoughts, emotions and sense perceptions. Have you noticed that a very high proportion of our day-to-day thinking is completely useless? If I asked you what percentage of your daily thoughts were not really of any use to you whatsoever, what number would you give? 50%? 70%? I would suggest that it is even higher than you might think, perhaps even 90%. 

Going even further, a very high proportion of this useless thinking is actually extremely harmful to us. Our brains are very powerful biological habit-forming computers and left to their own devices, will run out of control with devastating consequences.

Would you you ever get into your car and start driving without your hands on the wheel and your eyes closed? No, of course you wouldn’t. But this is what we’re doing when we allow the mind to operate on its own without any level of ‘Awareness’.

The mind forms habits which are essentially revolving patterns of thought that are automatically repeated over and over. What is happening in the brain during this process? Thoughts are electrical impulses travelling down the length of a neuron and every time a set of neurons fire of in a certain pattern, the pathways become stronger. If a neural pathway becomes stronger, it has a tendency to fire off more often. You can imagine these patterns as grooves in your mind and the more you send thoughts down the grooves, the deeper they get. After a while it becomes almost impossible to stop a particular thought pattern or thinking process.

Try this little exercise; at random times during the day, suddenly become aware of what you are thinking about and what you have been thinking about for the last few minutes. When you become aware of your thoughts, ask yourself this; are your thoughts useful? Are you perhaps thinking about the things you have to do today or tomorrow, a presentation that is due in the morning, or perhaps you need to go shopping later? On the other hand, are the thoughts very negative? Are you annoyed with something? Frustrated with someone? Perhaps you are angry at events that are happening in the world or maybe someone at work has caused you some problems? Or perhaps you are afraid of something? Anxiety is one of the most common forms of suffering. Have you been locked in a negative mind stream that you were completely unaware of? This is exactly how we suffer, from a psychological perspective.

Our day-to-day mind stream is very closely linked to how we are actually feeling throughout the day due to what is called the ‘emotional cycle’. Our thinking processes are directly responsible for the emotions that we feel. You might have previously thought that it is the external circumstances in your life that are causing your emotions but take a closer look. The external  2 circumstances are just the triggers, the emotions that you feel are coming directly from your thinking habits.

Both the mind stream and the emotional cycle are created from our past emotional traumas and past thinking patterns. We tend to get locked in cycles of negative thinking which creates negative emotions which in turn create more negative thinking. As events happen in our lives, these negative thinking patterns and emotions may well encourage us to react badly and the more we react badly to our life circumstances, the more negative situations will tend to occur. This is a cycle of suffering that we are powerless to stop unless we become aware of the mind stream.

What is
meditation
foR?

What is
meditation
foR?

There is a way out of this negative state of being, we must ‘awaken our awareness’. We do this through meditation. But what is meditation? And what is it for?

The real goal of meditation has been lost somewhat in our present culture. When an activity becomes very popular, the ‘commercial machine’ tends to get hold of it and it gets turned into a product. The product then diversifies into a myriad of different products as those selling the products try and offer something new and different from the rest. This is not a bad thing when the product is meditation because any type of meditation is very good for our health however during this process, it is easy for the essence, or the real goal to get lost. If you ask most people today what meditation is for, they may well answer that it is good for our mental health. This is true, but it does not capture the full potential of meditation.

Meditation is a journey with a beginning and an end goal. Through this journey, we slowly become aware of the mind stream and we begin to realise that our mind stream is actually creating our very own personality. Our thinking patterns throughout the day are actually contributing to our future experiences and therefore if we become aware our thinking patterns, we can start to shape our personalities in a positive way.

"If I asked, ‘who or what are you’? What would say?"

There is a way out of this negative state of being, we must ‘awaken our awareness’. We do this through meditation. But what is meditation? And what is it for?

The real goal of meditation has been lost somewhat in our present culture. When an activity becomes very popular, the ‘commercial machine’ tends to get hold of it and it gets turned into a product. The product then diversifies into a myriad of different products as those selling the products try and offer something new and different from the rest. This is not a bad thing when the product is meditation because any type of meditation is very good for our health however during this process, it is easy for the essence, or the real goal to get lost. If you ask most people today what meditation is for, they may well answer that it is good for our mental health. This is true, but it does not capture the full potential of meditation.

Meditation is a journey with a beginning and an end goal. Through this journey, we slowly become aware of the mind stream and we begin to realise that our mind stream is actually creating our very own personality. Our thinking patterns throughout the day are actually contributing to our future experiences and therefore if we become aware our thinking patterns, we can start to shape our personalities in a positive way.

If I asked, ‘who or what are you’? What would say?

The real goal of meditation is to become aware that our personality is a shifting and moving process which is in a way, a type of illusion. If our personality can change drastically through the course of our lives, how can it be real? There is however a part of us that is very real and completely unchanging. Through meditation, we gain the ability to quieten our mind stream and in doing so, we find a dimension of our experience that is just behind the mind, it is forever peaceful, it is our own consciousness, our own awareness. It is our real nature, our real Self. When we become lost in thought, we lose our awareness and end up at the mercy of the un- controlled mind. Conversely, when we become rooted in our awareness, we find an unshakable inner peace which is not dependent on any external circumstance of our lives. It is possible to live in a state of being which never leaves this inner peace, and this state of being is called Self Realisation. Self-Realisation is the realisation of our true Self. But this is not some lofty, mystical state of being, this is a natural psychological state of being which is possible to activate through the Journey of Meditation.

Imagine a society whereby everyone has become aware of this concept. This is where real peace lies. It lies dormant in the inner experience of every individual just waiting to be found.

So how do we live every day in a natural state of peace? We start at the beginning of thejourney.

The real goal of meditation is to become aware that our personality is a shifting and moving process which is in a way, a type of illusion. If our personality can change drastically through the course of our lives, how can it be real? There is however a part of us that is very real and completely unchanging. Through meditation, we gain the ability to quieten our mind stream and in doing so, we find a dimension of our experience that is just behind the mind, it is forever peaceful, it is our own consciousness, our own awareness. It is our real nature, our real Self. When we become lost in thought, we lose our awareness and end up at the mercy of the un- controlled mind. Conversely, when we become rooted in our awareness, we find an unshakable inner peace which is not dependent on any external circumstance of our lives. It is possible to live in a state of being which never leaves this inner peace, and this state of being is called Self Realisation. Self-Realisation is the realisation of our true Self. But this is not some lofty, mystical state of being, this is a natural psychological state of being which is possible to activate through the Journey of Meditation.

Imagine a society whereby everyone has become aware of this concept. This is where real peace lies. It lies dormant in the inner experience of every individual just waiting to be found.

So how do we live every day in a natural state of peace? We start at the beginning of thejourney.

Subject
& Object

When we begin the practice of meditation, it is very important to become aware of this very simple but unusual concept. If we become aware of it at the start of our journey, it will most definitely help at the end. When we are meditating, we have created a split between a Subject and an Object. The Subject is you and the Object is whatever you are focusing your attention on. You may be meditating on a visualisation, a mantra, or perhaps a particular sound or music, or you could be focusing on the inner sensations of the body, or the thoughts and emotions themselves. In every case, a Subject and Object relationship has been created by the meditation. The goal of meditation is to become aware of the Subject (you) and you can only do this by creating a split between the you and the contents of your mind. Who or what is doing the

meditating? It is you of course, what a silly question! But I will ask again, what is doing the meditating? It is the Subject, it is You, it is pure Consciousness, it is pure Awareness.

At the start of the journey, it can be very difficult to notice the consciousness behind the mind because we are so used to thinking that we are the mind but if we hold the concept of Subject and Object as a central theme throughout our Journey of meditation, we will find it much easier at the end to break through the prison of the mind and find our freedom, and the everlasting peace that it brings.

" Suffering is the negative emotions that are created by a conditioned subconscious mind which is shaped by our repetitive-thinking mind stream."

Subject
& Object

When we begin the practice of meditation, it is very important to become aware of this very simple but unusual concept. If we become aware of it at the start of our journey, it will most definitely help at the end. When we are meditating, we have created a split between a Subject and an Object. The Subject is you and the Object is whatever you are focusing your attention on. You may be meditating on a visualisation, a mantra, or perhaps a particular sound or music, or you could be focusing on the inner sensations of the body, or the thoughts and emotions themselves. In every case, a Subject and Object relationship has been created by the meditation. The goal of meditation is to become aware of the Subject (you) and you can only do this by creating a split between the you and the contents of your mind. Who or what is doing the

meditating? It is you of course, what a silly question! But I will ask again, what is doing the meditating? It is the Subject, it is You, it is pure Consciousness, it is pure Awareness.

At the start of the journey, it can be very difficult to notice the consciousness behind the mind because we are so used to thinking that we are the mind but if we hold the concept of Subject and Object as a central theme throughout our Journey of meditation, we will find it much easier at the end to break through the prison of the mind and find our freedom, and the everlasting peace that it brings.

" Suffering is the negative emotions that are created by a conditioned subconscious mind which is shaped by our repetitive-thinking mind stream."

Subject
& Object

When we begin the practice of meditation, it is very important to become aware of this very simple but unusual concept. If we become aware of it at the start of our journey, it will most definitely help at the end. When we are meditating, we have created a split between a Subject and an Object. The Subject is you and the Object is whatever you are focusing your attention on. You may be meditating on a visualisation, a mantra, or perhaps a particular sound or music, or you could be focusing on the inner sensations of the body, or the thoughts and emotions themselves. In every case, a Subject and Object relationship has been created by the meditation. The goal of meditation is to become aware of the Subject (you) and you can only do this by creating a split between the you and the contents of your mind. Who or what is doing the

meditating? It is you of course, what a silly question! But I will ask again, what is doing the meditating? It is the Subject, it is You, it is pure Consciousness, it is pure Awareness.

At the start of the journey, it can be very difficult to notice the consciousness behind the mind because we are so used to thinking that we are the mind but if we hold the concept of Subject and Object as a central theme throughout our Journey of meditation, we will find it much easier at the end to break through the prison of the mind and find our freedom, and the everlasting peace that it brings.

"Suffering is the negative emotions that are created by a conditioned subconscious mind which is shaped by our repetitive-thinking mind stream."

TRAINING
your attention

There are so many different forms of meditation available, it can be difficult to know where to start but whatever type you are drawn to, the process will be the same. The focus of attention has to be trained just like a muscle and just like a muscle, the more you use it, the stronger it grows. As you focus your attention on an Object of meditation, whatever it may be, the aim is to keep your awareness for as long as possible. What does this mean? It is natural for the mind to produce a constant stream of thoughts and it is very enticing to go along with these thoughts and if we do so, we get lost in the mind stream. This means that we have lost our awareness. However, when you suddenly realise that you are lost in the mind stream, you have regained your awareness. As soon as this happens, you must gently bring your focus back onto the Object of meditation and continue.

At the start of the journey, you may find it very difficult to focus on the object successfully and you may even find that a whole meditation session passes by completely lost in the mind stream. Do not let this put you off, it is quite normal, and tenacity will win in the end. The more effort is put in, the more effortless it will become.

A common misconception is that meditation should be practised at a particular time or place. A common example is of a person sat in a crossed legged position with their eyes closed, perhaps sat on a cushion in a darkened room. Although meditation can be done this way, the real goal of mediation is lost if the mind stream takes over for the rest of the day. We do not need to take 30 minutes out of our day to meditate, meditation can be practised with our eyes open, while we are walking, running, watching television, in fact it can be practiced at all moments of our day.

TRAINING
your attention

There are so many different forms of meditation available, it can be difficult to know where to start but whatever type you are drawn to, the process will be the same. The focus of attention has to be trained just like a muscle and just like a muscle, the more you use it, the stronger it grows. As you focus your attention on an Object of meditation, whatever it may be, the aim is to keep your awareness for as long as possible. What does this mean? It is natural for the mind to produce a constant stream of thoughts and it is very enticing to go along with these thoughts and if we do so, we get lost in the mind stream. This means that we have lost our awareness. However, when you suddenly realise that you are lost in the mind stream, you have regained your awareness. As soon as this happens, you must gently bring your focus back onto the Object of meditation and continue.

At the start of the journey, you may find it very difficult to focus on the object successfully and you may even find that a whole meditation session passes by completely lost in the mind stream. Do not let this put you off, it is quite normal, and tenacity will win in the end. The more effort is put in, the more effortless it will become.

A common misconception is that meditation should be practised at a particular time or place. A common example is of a person sat in a crossed legged position with their eyes closed, perhaps sat on a cushion in a darkened room. Although meditation can be done this way, the real goal of mediation is lost if the mind stream takes over for the rest of the day. We do not need to take 30 minutes out of our day to meditate, meditation can be practised with our eyes open, while we are walking, running, watching television, in fact it can be practiced at all moments of our day.

"Use your mind like a car. Only get into it when you want to go from A to B. Afterwards, get out of the car, shut the car door and go back into your home."

"Use your mind like a car. Only get into it when you want to go from A to B. Afterwards, get out of the car, shut the car door and go back into your home."

"Use your mind like a car. Only get into it when you want to go from A to B. Afterwards, get out of the car, shut the car door and go back into your home."

TYPES OF
MEDITATION

It takes natural concentration to produce a piece of art and therefore is very therapeutic as well as training the focus of attention. While you are creating, notice that there is a subject (you) that is focusing intently on the art that you are creating (object). You may also like to notice that the creativity is actually coming from the space of still awareness, not the mind.

It is possible to meditate while you are walking (or running). The aim is to find a Subject and Object relationship, and this is done by focusing your attention on the soles of your feet. Place your attention in the sensations that are felt in your feet and feel intently how it feels, where the pressure is felt and how it moves around as you shift your weight.

In the same way that you can meditate while walking, it is possible to meditate during any exercise. Place your attention in the body at the place where the most tension is felt, usually in one of the muscle groups that you are using. If you practise long enough, this will become second nature and it is a very useful habit as you can do two things at once (fitness and meditation) which helps tremendously for those with a busy day.

You can meditate while listening to music but only if you concentrate intently on each part of the song or music. Try and dissect the song by placing your focus of attention on each musical instrument or drum beat in turn. Keep your mind focused intently on the music and if 6 your mind wanders into the mind stream, gently bring it back to the sounds of the music in the present moment.

We have to use our minds to go through the process of learning an instrument, but I mention it here as it is very therapeutic and helps train the focus of attention while keeping the mind from drifting accidently into the mind stream.

Yes, watching television! Instead of becoming completely absorbed into the drama of an episode of a series, or a film, and forgetting all notion of where you are and what you are doing, try becoming aware of yourself every now and then. Try and move your focus of attention away from the screen and onto the side of the television every few minutes, or as often as you can. This helps to gain a certain level of control over the mind and it is always interesting to see how many times you can remember to do it! You may also draw parallels from this exercise into the drama of day-to-day life.

Every time you walk up the stairs make a point of placing your attention in your feet as you climb. This is a variant on walking meditation.

During every meal, take the opportunity to meditate instead of letting the mind run away with itself. Concentrate on every mouthful by placing the focus of your attention in your jaws as they move up and down, feeling the pressure between your teeth and the textures inside your mouth. This has the added benefit of helping with controlling the appetite because the eating process becomes much more conscious instead of automatic.

Many forms of meditation use a visualisation which can either be performed with eyes closed such as using the light pattern on the backs of the eyelids, or with eyes open using an object that is focused on, such as a candle flame, or a u-tube sourced psychedelic moving pattern. Or sometimes a pattern or shape is chosen and visualised in the mind’s eye.
Mantras and affirmations are a common and traditional form of meditation where the object of meditation becomes a repeated word, phrase or sentence.
Placing the focus of our attention inside our body can be a very. effective form of meditation as inner body sensation are always with us! We do not need to sit down for 30 minutes to meditate, we can find our inner body awareness at any time of the day or night.
This is a wonderfully useful meditation and a variant on the inner-body awareness. When we feel a strong negative emotion such as frustration, anger, fear, grief, sadness, we can find the emotion in the body and place our attention on it as an object of meditation. The emotion is generated by a thought process, but it will always end up being felt somewhere as a sensation, usually somewhere along the front of our body, between our face and our stomach. If we meditate on the emotion, we allow it to flow, we allow it to be, and in doing so, we stop ourselves from repressing the emotion. At the same time, we are stopping 7 the thought processes that generated it. When we shut the fuel off, the emotional engine has no choice but to evaporate.
The way mindfulness meditation works is by training us to remain fully aware in our inner experience. We try and quietly and peacefully examine the contents of our experience. If thoughts and emotions arise, we try and allow them to arise and then allow them to dissipate without becoming lost in the mind stream. The object of meditation in this instance has become all the contents of the mind whether it is a thought, an emotion, a sensation in the body or another sense perception such as sight or hearing.
It is possible to meditate during virtually any activity. And as you will see, the ultimate goal will be to meditate all day long so why not start now!
It is very important to note that during all of these activities, if you notice the mind stream wandering away and getting lost in thought, as soon as you notice, gently bring the focus of attention back to the object.

TYPES OF
MEDITATION

It takes natural concentration to produce a piece of art and therefore is very therapeutic as well as training the focus of attention. While you are creating, notice that there is a subject (you) that is focusing intently on the art that you are creating (object). You may also like to notice that the creativity is actually coming from the space of still awareness, not the mind.

It is possible to meditate while you are walking (or running). The aim is to find a Subject and Object relationship, and this is done by focusing your attention on the soles of your feet. Place your attention in the sensations that are felt in your feet and feel intently how it feels, where the pressure is felt and how it moves around as you shift your weight.

In the same way that you can meditate while walking, it is possible to meditate during any exercise. Place your attention in the body at the place where the most tension is felt, usually in one of the muscle groups that you are using. If you practise long enough, this will become second nature and it is a very useful habit as you can do two things at once (fitness and meditation) which helps tremendously for those with a busy day.

You can meditate while listening to music but only if you concentrate intently on each part of the song or music. Try and dissect the song by placing your focus of attention on each musical instrument or drum beat in turn. Keep your mind focused intently on the music and if 6 your mind wanders into the mind stream, gently bring it back to the sounds of the music in the present moment.

We have to use our minds to go through the process of learning an instrument, but I mention it here as it is very therapeutic and helps train the focus of attention while keeping the mind from drifting accidently into the mind stream.

Yes, watching television! Instead of becoming completely absorbed into the drama of an episode of a series, or a film, and forgetting all notion of where you are and what you are doing, try becoming aware of yourself every now and then. Try and move your focus of attention away from the screen and onto the side of the television every few minutes, or as often as you can. This helps to gain a certain level of control over the mind and it is always interesting to see how many times you can remember to do it! You may also draw parallels from this exercise into the drama of day-to-day life.

Every time you walk up the stairs make a point of placing your attention in your feet as you climb. This is a variant on walking meditation.

During every meal, take the opportunity to meditate instead of letting the mind run away with itself. Concentrate on every mouthful by placing the focus of your attention in your jaws as they move up and down, feeling the pressure between your teeth and the textures inside your mouth. This has the added benefit of helping with controlling the appetite because the eating process becomes much more conscious instead of automatic.

Many forms of meditation use a visualisation which can either be performed with eyes closed such as using the light pattern on the backs of the eyelids, or with eyes open using an object that is focused on, such as a candle flame, or a u-tube sourced psychedelic moving pattern. Or sometimes a pattern or shape is chosen and visualised in the mind’s eye.
Mantras and affirmations are a common and traditional form of meditation where the object of meditation becomes a repeated word, phrase or sentence.
Placing the focus of our attention inside our body can be a very. effective form of meditation as inner body sensation are always with us! We do not need to sit down for 30 minutes to meditate, we can find our inner body awareness at any time of the day or night.
This is a wonderfully useful meditation and a variant on the inner-body awareness. When we feel a strong negative emotion such as frustration, anger, fear, grief, sadness, we can find the emotion in the body and place our attention on it as an object of meditation. The emotion is generated by a thought process, but it will always end up being felt somewhere as a sensation, usually somewhere along the front of our body, between our face and our stomach. If we meditate on the emotion, we allow it to flow, we allow it to be, and in doing so, we stop ourselves from repressing the emotion. At the same time, we are stopping 7 the thought processes that generated it. When we shut the fuel off, the emotional engine has no choice but to evaporate.
The way mindfulness meditation works is by training us to remain fully aware in our inner experience. We try and quietly and peacefully examine the contents of our experience. If thoughts and emotions arise, we try and allow them to arise and then allow them to dissipate without becoming lost in the mind stream. The object of meditation in this instance has become all the contents of the mind whether it is a thought, an emotion, a sensation in the body or another sense perception such as sight or hearing.
It is possible to meditate during virtually any activity. And as you will see, the ultimate goal will be to meditate all day long so why not start now!
It is very important to note that during all of these activities, if you notice the mind stream wandering away and getting lost in thought, as soon as you notice, gently bring the focus of attention back to the object.

TYPES OF
MEDITATION

It takes natural concentration to produce a piece of art and therefore is very therapeutic as well as training the focus of attention. While you are creating, notice that there is a subject (you) that is focusing intently on the art that you are creating (object). You may also like to notice that the creativity is actually coming from the space of still awareness, not the mind.

It is possible to meditate while you are walking (or running). The aim is to find a Subject and Object relationship, and this is done by focusing your attention on the soles of your feet. Place your attention in the sensations that are felt in your feet and feel intently how it feels, where the pressure is felt and how it moves around as you shift your weight.

In the same way that you can meditate while walking, it is possible to meditate during any exercise. Place your attention in the body at the place where the most tension is felt, usually in one of the muscle groups that you are using. If you practise long enough, this will become second nature and it is a very useful habit as you can do two things at once (fitness and meditation) which helps tremendously for those with a busy day.

You can meditate while listening to music but only if you concentrate intently on each part of the song or music. Try and dissect the song by placing your focus of attention on each musical instrument or drum beat in turn. Keep your mind focused intently on the music and if 6 your mind wanders into the mind stream, gently bring it back to the sounds of the music in the present moment.

We have to use our minds to go through the process of learning an instrument, but I mention it here as it is very therapeutic and helps train the focus of attention while keeping the mind from drifting accidently into the mind stream.

Yes, watching television! Instead of becoming completely absorbed into the drama of an episode of a series, or a film, and forgetting all notion of where you are and what you are doing, try becoming aware of yourself every now and then. Try and move your focus of attention away from the screen and onto the side of the television every few minutes, or as often as you can. This helps to gain a certain level of control over the mind and it is always interesting to see how many times you can remember to do it! You may also draw parallels from this exercise into the drama of day-to-day life.

Every time you walk up the stairs make a point of placing your attention in your feet as you climb. This is a variant on walking meditation.

During every meal, take the opportunity to meditate instead of letting the mind run away with itself. Concentrate on every mouthful by placing the focus of your attention in your jaws as they move up and down, feeling the pressure between your teeth and the textures inside your mouth. This has the added benefit of helping with controlling the appetite because the eating process becomes much more conscious instead of automatic.

Many forms of meditation use a visualisation which can either be performed with eyes closed such as using the light pattern on the backs of the eyelids, or with eyes open using an object that is focused on, such as a candle flame, or a u-tube sourced psychedelic moving pattern. Or sometimes a pattern or shape is chosen and visualised in the mind’s eye.
Mantras and affirmations are a common and traditional form of meditation where the object of meditation becomes a repeated word, phrase or sentence.
Placing the focus of our attention inside our body can be a very. effective form of meditation as inner body sensation are always with us! We do not need to sit down for 30 minutes to meditate, we can find our inner body awareness at any time of the day or night.
This is a wonderfully useful meditation and a variant on the inner-body awareness. When we feel a strong negative emotion such as frustration, anger, fear, grief, sadness, we can find the emotion in the body and place our attention on it as an object of meditation. The emotion is generated by a thought process, but it will always end up being felt somewhere as a sensation, usually somewhere along the front of our body, between our face and our stomach. If we meditate on the emotion, we allow it to flow, we allow it to be, and in doing so, we stop ourselves from repressing the emotion. At the same time, we are stopping 7 the thought processes that generated it. When we shut the fuel off, the emotional engine has no choice but to evaporate.
The way mindfulness meditation works is by training us to remain fully aware in our inner experience. We try and quietly and peacefully examine the contents of our experience. If thoughts and emotions arise, we try and allow them to arise and then allow them to dissipate without becoming lost in the mind stream. The object of meditation in this instance has become all the contents of the mind whether it is a thought, an emotion, a sensation in the body or another sense perception such as sight or hearing.
It is possible to meditate during virtually any activity. And as you will see, the ultimate goal will be to meditate all day long so why not start now!
It is very important to note that during all of these activities, if you notice the mind stream wandering away and getting lost in thought, as soon as you notice, gently bring the focus of attention back to the object.

UN-SHAKEABLE
INNER PEACE

Once the attention has been trained enough to allow us to keep our awareness in Subject Object meditation for a good length of time without getting lost in the mind stream, it will be time to progress to the next stage of the journey which is Objectless meditation. This is the end goal of meditation and one could even say that it is the only real meditation, and all other forms of meditation are no longer needed. Objectless meditation is literally meditating without an Object, and the Subject is all that is left. Another way of putting this is that you ‘rest in your own awareness’. You have become aware of your own consciousness and therefore, an Object is no longer needed, and the mind and all its Objects disappear right in front of you.

The longer we spend in Objectless meditation, the more we find that our own consciousness is actually very peaceful. In fact, we realise that it is peace. Normally experienced as a slow progression, we then begin to notice that our personalities have become more peaceful, more tolerant, more accepting, forgiving and more loving. The triggers in our lives that used to bother us before no longer bother us anymore and slowly but surely, our inner experience transforms from a turbulent state of being, to a state of being that can only be described as unshakable and everlasting inner peace. Why do we become more peaceful inside? If we do not give energy (our attention) to the revolving patterns of thought in the mind, they no longer grow, in fact instead they shrink. What happens if we spend as much time as possible in Objectless meditation? The harmful patterns of thoughts and emotions simply fall away from us. It is comparable to carrying heavy shopping bags around with us everywhere we go. Our back 5 becomes broken and bent and our arms become stretched and strained. Objectless meditation is the act of putting down the shopping bags and sighing a big sigh of relief!

When you awaken to your true nature as pure Awareness, staying in this peaceful state of being all day and all night long becomes the new goal. Yes, it even spreads to your dreams. But Objectless meditation is not some bizarre trance state, or a deep state of absorption. It is clear, clean and sharp and definitely the most conscious that is possible to become. We also do not become some sort of meditative vegetable. The mind is a very useful tool, and we use the mind for a task when it is needed and put it away again once we have finished. Returning to the car analogy, we get into the car to go from A to B and when we have arrived, we get out of the car, shut the car door and return to our home.

Our society is in need of a revolution. But the revolution needs to start with every one of us taking responsibility for our own inner experience. It is an inner peace revolution that we need, to return home, the end of the journey.

Maybe it is time for you to awaken to your true nature and all the benefits that it can bring – Awaken Your Awareness.

"Treat your mind like a car. When driving it, keep your eyes on the road, hands on the wheel, and focus on your destination. If you don’t, you will end up in the ditch."

TRAINING
your
attention

Once the attention has been trained enough to allow us to keep our awareness in Subject Object meditation for a good length of time without getting lost in the mind stream, it will be time to progress to the next stage of the journey which is Objectless meditation. This is the end goal of meditation and one could even say that it is the only real meditation, and all other forms of meditation are no longer needed. Objectless meditation is literally meditating without an Object, and the Subject is all that is left. Another way of putting this is that you ‘rest in your own awareness’. You have become aware of your own consciousness and therefore, an Object is no longer needed, and the mind and all its Objects disappear right in front of you.

The longer we spend in Objectless meditation, the more we find that our own consciousness is actually very peaceful. In fact, we realise that it is peace. Normally experienced as a slow progression, we then begin to notice that our personalities have become more peaceful, more tolerant, more accepting, forgiving and more loving. The triggers in our lives that used to bother us before no longer bother us anymore and slowly but surely, our inner experience transforms from a turbulent state of being, to a state of being that can only be described as unshakable and everlasting inner peace. Why do we become more peaceful inside? If we do not give energy (our attention) to the revolving patterns of thought in the mind, they no longer grow, in fact instead they shrink. What happens if we spend as much time as possible in Objectless meditation? The harmful patterns of thoughts and emotions simply fall away from us. It is comparable to carrying heavy shopping bags around with us everywhere we go. Our back 5 becomes broken and bent and our arms become stretched and strained. Objectless meditation is the act of putting down the shopping bags and sighing a big sigh of relief!

"Treat your mind like a car. When driving it, keep your eyes on the road, hands on the wheel, and focus on your destination. If you don’t, you will end up in the ditch."

When you awaken to your true nature as pure Awareness, staying in this peaceful state of being all day and all night long becomes the new goal. Yes, it even spreads to your dreams. But Objectless meditation is not some bizarre trance state, or a deep state of absorption. It is clear, clean and sharp and definitely the most conscious that is possible to become. We also do not become some sort of meditative vegetable. The mind is a very useful tool, and we use the mind for a task when it is needed and put it away again once we have finished. Returning to the car analogy, we get into the car to go from A to B and when we have arrived, we get out of the car, shut the car door and return to our home.

Our society is in need of a revolution. But the revolution needs to start with every one of us taking responsibility for our own inner experience. It is an inner peace revolution that we need, to return home, the end of the journey.

Maybe it is time for you to awaken to your true nature and all the benefits that it can bring – Awaken Your Awareness.

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